Create delivery zones

First, you'll create drive-time delivery zones around Wok & Roll. Ideally, you want customer orders to be delivered within 30 to 45 minutes. Food preparation, on average, takes about 10 minutes. A driver normally makes two to four stops per run, with each stop taking 3 to 5 minutes.

In light of this information, you decide to create two zones. Your standard delivery zone will include all addresses that can be reached within 7 minutes. For addresses that take more than 7 minutes to reach—but fewer than 10—you'll add a delivery surcharge to the order.

Specify the store location

Before creating the delivery zones, you need to open a new map and add a point representing the restaurant's location in Lauderhill, Florida.

  1. Sign in to your ArcGIS organizational account.
    Note:

    If you don't have an organizational account, you can sign up for an ArcGIS free trial.

  2. At the top of the organization home page, click Map.

    Map

    A map opens to the extent of the continental United States.

    United States

    Note:

    The default map extent is set by the administrator of your ArcGIS Online organization, so your map may show a different area. If so, don't worry: you'll zoom to the correct extent in the next step.

  3. On the ribbon above the map, click in the search box and type 7580 W Commercial Blvd, Lauderhill, Florida, USA.

    As you type, a list of possible matching addresses is displayed. Wok & Roll is located in the city of Lauderhill; however, address locators sometimes return multiple cities for the same location. In this lesson, the restaurant returns locations for the cities of Lauderhill and Fort Lauderdale.

  4. Click the matching address when it appears in the search box.

    Search box

    Tip:
    You can also copy and paste the address into the search box and press Enter. If you use the list, make sure to select the correct city, state, and zip code.

    The map zooms to the address of Wok & Roll.

    Location

    Tip:

    If you don't see anything on your screen, use the navigation control in the upper left corner of the map to zoom out one level.

    Now you need to put a point on the map at this location. You do this by adding a map note. (A map note sounds like it would be text—and it can be—but it can also include points, lines, and other shapes.)

  5. At the bottom of the Search result pop-up, click Add to Map Notes.

    Add to Map Notes

    A Map Notes layer is added to the map and Contents pane.

    Map notes in Map and Contents pane

    Notice that the Map Notes layer is given the default name Map Notes. You'll rename the Map Notes layer to better describe the layer contents.

  6. In the Contents pane, point to the Map Notes layer. Click the More Options button and choose Rename.

    Rename Map Notes

  7. In the Rename window, change the layer name from Map Notes to Wok & Roll.

    Rename Map Notes to Wok & Roll

  8. Click OK.
  9. On the map, point to the blue pin that represents Wok & Roll. Click the pin to view its pop-up.

    Map Note Pop-up Contents

    Currently the pop-up doesn't tell you very much. Next you'll make some changes to the Map Note to better describe the data.

  10. In the bottom of the pop-up, click Edit.

    Edit Map Note

  11. In the Points window, change the title to Wok & Roll.

    Change Points Title

    The default symbol is okay, but you would like to replace it with something that catches the eye and distinguishes Wok & Roll from the dots, numbers, and letters that will eventually populate your map.

  12. At the bottom of the Points window, click the Change Symbol button.

    The symbol window shows a scrolling box of symbols to choose from. The default style is Shapes, but there are other styles.

  13. Change the symbol style to Basic.
  14. Scroll down to the bottom row. Click the red flag to select it.

    Change symbol

    Even though a red flag doesn't exactly suggest Chinese food, this symbol will do.

    Note:

    You don't have to use the symbol shown here. You can choose any symbol from any style.

  15. Click OK.
  16. Click Close on the Wok & Roll (Points) pop-up.
  17. If necessary, zoom out one or two levels until the main streets are labeled on the basemap.

    Your map, with its new restaurant symbol, should look like this:

    Restaurant symbol

  18. On the ribbon, click the Details button to stop adding map notes.

    The Contents pane now shows the Wok & Roll layer in addition to the Topographic basemap.

    Note:

    If you want to edit the Wok & Roll map note (for example, to change its symbol or size), click it on the map to select it and then click Edit on its pop-up. If you want to add more map notes to the layer (for example, if you open a new restaurant), click the Edit button on the ribbon to open the Add Features pane. When you're finished, click the Details button.

    You're just about ready to create the delivery zones around the restaurant. But first, it's a good idea to save the map.

  19. On the ribbon, click the Save button and choose Save.
  20. In the Save Map window, in the Title box, type Wok & Roll Delivery Zones.
  21. In the Tags box, type drive-time areas and press Enter. Add tags for restaurants and Florida, pressing Enter after each tag.
    Tip:

    You can add all your tags at once by typing a comma after each tag and pressing Enter when you're finished.

  22. In the Summary box, type 7/10 minute delivery zones for Wok & Roll.

    Save map

  23. Click Save Map.

    The map name change is reflected at the top of the page. The map is saved in My Content, which you can access from the content page. My Content is your personal repository for ArcGIS Online items.

Create the delivery zones

Customers within a 7-minute drive of the store will pay the usual amount. On a trial basis, customers in the 7-to-10-minute zone will have a three-dollar delivery charge added to their order. Addresses more than 10 minutes away will be outside your deliverable area and will be declined with regret.

  1. In the Contents pane, point to the Wok & Roll layer and click the Perform Analysis button.

    Perform Analysis

    Tip:

    You can also access the Perform Analysis pane from the ribbon.

  2. In the Perform Analysis pane, click Use Proximity and choose Create Drive-Time Areas.

    Use Proximity

  3. At the top of the Create Drive-Time Areas pane, in the Measure section, choose Driving Time. Confirm that the units are set to Minutes.
  4. In the text box, delete the default value of 5. Type 7, press the spacebar once, and type 10.

    Create Drive-Time Areas

    Two areas will be drawn on the map. One will be the area within 7 minutes of the restaurant and the other will be the area within 7 to 10 minutes.

  5. Check the Use traffic box.

    The area within a 7-minute drive of the store may not be the same on a Monday night as it is on a Friday night. Your delivery problems have been on weekends, so you want to base your delivery zones on your busiest time.

  6. Click the Traffic based on typical conditions for option. Set the day to Friday and the time to 6:00 PM.

    Use traffic

  7. Change the result layer name to Delivery zones, and add your name or initials to the layer name to make sure it's unique in the organization.
    Note:

    Layers created by analysis operations are web services with URLs—that's why they must have unique names. Once the URL has been created, the layer can be renamed in your map.

  8. Uncheck the Use current map extent box.

    Run analysis

    Unchecking this box ensures that the analysis is applied to the full extent of the map and not just the extent presently shown on your computer.

  9. Click Show credits.

    Credit Usage Report

    This operation will use one credit.

    Note:

    Every ArcGIS Online analysis operation uses credits, which are the currency of the system. You can get more information about credits and how they're estimated on the Esri Service Credits Overview page.

  10. Close the Credit Usage Report window.
  11. At the bottom of the pane, click Run Analysis.

    When the operation finishes, the delivery zones layer is added to the map and saved as an item in My Content.

  12. In the Contents pane, point to the Delivery zones layer. Click the More Options button and choose Zoom to.

    Drive-time area

    The map shows the areas within a 7-minute drive of the restaurant in light purple. The 7-to-10 minute zone is shown in darker purple.

  13. In the Contents pane, point to the Delivery zones layer. Click the More Options button and choose Rename.
  14. In the Rename window, change the layer name by removing your name. Click OK.
  15. Click the name of the Delivery zones layer to expand its legend.

    Delivery zones layer

    Ideally, the 10-minute delivery zone fills your map extent from top to bottom, but your view may be different depending on the size and resolution of your monitor.

  16. If necessary, zoom in so that the delivery zones fill as much of your screen as possible without being cut off.

    You'll return to this map view often, so it's a good idea to bookmark it.

  17. On the ribbon, click Bookmarks and choose Add Bookmark.
  18. In the text box, type Delivery zones and press Enter.

    Bookmarks

  19. Close the Bookmarks window.
  20. Save the map.

    You're ready to test your map with some sample addresses.

Test the delivery zones

With the Wok & Roll Delivery Zones map running on the laptop computer you use in the restaurant, you'll be able to take a customer order and determine what delivery zone the address falls in.

  1. On the ribbon, in the search box, click the X to clear the search. Type (or copy and paste) 6111 NW 70th Ave Tamarac Florida and press Enter.

    Tamarac

    The map zooms to the address. You see that it falls within the 7-minute, light-purple zone: a standard delivery.

  2. On the ribbon, click Bookmarks and click Delivery zones.

    The map zooms out to place the location in context. The address is slightly northeast of the restaurant.

  3. In the search box, clear the search. Type 10770 W Oakland Park Blvd Sunrise Florida and press Enter.

    Sunrise

  4. Zoom to the Delivery zones bookmark.

    The location is placed in geographic context. It lies some distance southwest of Wok & Roll.

  5. Close the Search result pop-up.
  6. Save the map.

    The delivery zones allow you to tell a customer right away whether a surcharge will be added to the order or whether their address lies outside the delivery zone altogether.

Improve the map's usability

As the restaurant manager, you'll be the map's primary user, but you may also want to show the map to others—especially to the restaurant's owner. A couple of changes will improve the map's appearance and usability. First, you'll change the basemap to a simpler one: the Topographic map shows more detail than you need. After that, you'll configure pop-ups for the delivery zones.

  1. On the ribbon, click Basemap. In the Select a basemap window, choose Light Gray Canvas.

    Light Gray Canvas

    From the point of view of finding addresses and getting directions, it makes no difference which basemap you use. The Light Gray Canvas basemap is less busy and will make the map more readable when you begin adding driving routes.

  2. On the map, click somewhere in the light-purple delivery zone.

    Pop-up

    The zone is selected (highlighted in blue), and a pop-up displays the information created by the analysis. Most of it isn't very useful, and it might confuse the owner when you show them the map. All you really want the pop-up to do is identify the drive time of the selected area. This information is shown in the Travel Time End (Minutes) field.

  3. Close the pop-up.
  4. In the Contents pane, point to the Delivery zones layer. Click the More Options button and choose Configure Pop-up.

    Open Configure Pop-up from More Options menu

  5. In the Configure Pop-up pane, delete the text in the Pop-up Title box.
  6. Next to the Pop-up Title box, click the Add Field Name button and choose the Travel Time End (Minutes) field.

    Pop-up Title

    In the Pop-up Title text box, the field name {ToBreak} is added. This may seem confusing. The pop-up information that displays on the map is stored in a table. The table puts technical restrictions on field names (for example, they can't have spaces). Because of the restrictions, field names are often cryptic, so the software creates aliases, or more readable versions of the names. In this case, Travel Time End (Minutes) is the alias of the {ToBreak} field.

    In the Pop-up Title box, the {ToBreak} field name behaves like a variable. It will show the appropriate value (7 or 10) according to which delivery zone you click.

  7. In the Pop-up Title box, after {ToBreak}, press the spacebar and type minute delivery zone.

    Pop-up Title final

  8. In the Pop-up Contents section, for Display, choose No attribute information.

    Pop-up Contents

    All other information in the pop-up will be suppressed.

  9. At the bottom of the Configure Pop-up pane, click OK.

    On the map, click somewhere in the standard delivery zone.

    Pop-up final

  10. Now click somewhere in the surcharge zone to see that it shows the correct value in minutes (10.00).
  11. Close the pop-up.

    There's a small problem with the number formatting. You don't want to show decimal places.

  12. Open the Configure Pop-up pane for the Delivery zones layer.
  13. In the middle of the pane, just above the Pop-up Media heading, click Configure Attributes.
  14. In the Configure Attributes window, click somewhere in the row containing the {ToBreak} field name.

    The row is highlighted.

  15. On the right side of the window, change Format to 0 decimal places.

    Pop-up decimals

  16. Click OK in the Configure Attributes window.
  17. At the bottom of the Configure Pop-up pane, click OK.
  18. On the map, click somewhere in a delivery zone.

    Pop-up no decimals

  19. Close the pop-up.

    The pop-up now provides just the one key piece of information a map user would need.

  20. Save the map.

You've created and symbolized a Map Notes layer to represent the Wok & Roll restaurant. You also created 7- and 10-minute delivery zones around the restaurant. Having tested the zones with sample addresses, you're confident that you can quickly let customers know if they'll be charged a delivery surcharge or if they live outside your delivery area. Finally, you improved the map's usability by changing the basemap and configuring pop-ups for the delivery zones.


Manage driver routes

Previously, you created two delivery zones based on typical Friday night driving times. Even within the standard delivery zone, your two drivers, Blaze and Otto, sometimes have trouble keeping up with the orders on a busy weekend night. You can use ArcGIS Online to help them take the best routes, especially when multiple stops are involved, and to get a good idea of how long they will be on the road. Optimizing their routes may save you the expense of hiring another part-time driver—or confirm that more help is needed.

Open the delivery zones map

You'll continue working with the map you saved in the last lesson. If the map is already open in your browser, skip to the next section.

  1. If necessary, sign in to your ArcGIS organizational account.
  2. At the top of the page, click Content.
  3. In My Content, click the ellipsis next to your Wok & Roll Delivery Zones map, and choose Open in Map Viewer.

    Open in Map Viewer

Get directions for a trip with one stop

You'll start by getting directions for a sample customer address.

  1. On the ribbon, in the search box, type 4101 N State Road 7 Lauderdale Lakes Florida and press Enter.

    The map zooms to the address, which lies in the surcharge zone. Suppose the customer accepts the three-dollar charge and places their order. Now you want to find the best route to the address.

  2. Copy the address from the Search result pop-up (select the customer address text to highlight it and press Ctrl+C).
  3. Close the Search result pop-up and zoom to the Delivery zones bookmark.
  4. Click the Wok & Roll symbol on the map to open its pop-up. On the pop-up, click Get Directions.

    Get Directions

    The side pane changes to Directions. On line A, Wok & Roll represents the start of the route.

  5. Click line B and press Ctrl+V to paste the customer address.

    You also want return directions back to the store.

  6. In the Directions pane, click Options and check the Return to start box.

    Directions

  7. Click the Get Directions button.

    Directions test

    On the map, the route is drawn as a blue line. At this map scale, it may look like a single line because the route to and from the customer address is the same. (At more zoomed-in scales, you would see that the return route uses the opposite side of the street.)

  8. Point to the white dots on the blue line to reveal direction segments.
    Note:

    When you point to the route, a larger white dot appears allowing you to change route directions. By dragging the route, you create a new course which will be reflected on the map and in the Directions pane. You can remove the new route by clicking the larger white dot, which restores your original route on the map as well as in the Directions pane.

    In the Directions pane, you see that the round-trip distance is 7.9 miles. Complete turn-by-turn directions for both trips and the expected trip time are also provided. The expected trip time will vary depending on the current day and time. (Results can also vary if your organization is using a custom route service or if the administrator configured the default directions and routing settings.) In the example, the expected trip time is 16 minutes.

    Directions full route

  9. Click Clear to clear the map.
  10. Zoom to the Delivery zones bookmark.

Get directions interactively

You don't always need to start by typing an address or even a place-name: you can also click the map to define a stop. This may be the most convenient way to get directions to a familiar landmark, when, for example, a customer wants an order delivered to a public place.

Suppose a caller wants an order delivered to Veterans Park. You could find the park by typing its name in the search box, but it happens to be near the restaurant and you know exactly where it is.

  1. Use the navigation tool in the upper left corner of the map to zoom in to an extent approximating the image below. (The Zoom in button turns gray when you reach the maximum zoom level.)

    Look for Veterans Park, which lies a short distance (about a third of a mile as the crow flies) to the southwest of Wok & Roll.

    Veterans Park

  2. In the Directions pane, confirm that the Add stops by clicking on the map button is active (blue).
  3. On line B, highlight and delete the current address.

    Directions pane

  4. On the map, click Veterans Park.

    Veterans Park directions

    The route from Wok & Roll to the park is drawn as a blue line. (Depending on where in the park you clicked, your route may be slightly different.) As before, the route to and from the destination is the same, but because you're zoomed in closer, you can see a separation between the lines.

    Suppose the customer calls back a few minutes after placing the order to say he'll meet the driver at the east entrance on 76th Terrace.

  5. On the map, point to the B letter symbol until it becomes a four-way arrow.

    Veterans Park location symbol

  6. Drag the letter symbol to the east side of the park where the main road (NW 76th Terrace) meets the park entrance.

    Veterans Park new location

    On the map, the route updates automatically. In the Directions pane, the distance and estimated trip time change, as do the turn-by-turn directions.

    Note:

    If your route originally went to the east side of the park, drag the letter symbol to the north park entrance on NW 53rd Street instead.

  7. In the Directions pane, click the Clear button.

    The route is cleared from the map and the directions are removed.

  8. Zoom to the Delivery zones bookmark.
    Tip:

    The Add stops by clicking on the map button is active by default. If you want to safeguard against the chance of adding a destination by mistake, click the button to deselect it. When the button is white, clicking the map will not add a destination.

Get directions for a trip with multiple stops

On Friday nights, orders come in quick succession. At Wok & Roll, it's not uncommon for a driver to make three deliveries before returning to the store. You know from experience that scheduling deliveries in the same order in which you took the calls isn't always the most efficient solution, but figuring out the best order of stops isn't easy.

You'll start with a few sample locations that are fairly close together in Tamarac. Suppose the first call comes in from 7878 South Colony Circle.

  1. In the search box, clear the existing address, type 7878 South Colony Circle Tamarac Florida and press Enter.

    The address is within your light-purple standard delivery zone.

  2. On the Search result pop-up, highlight the customer address. Press Ctrl+C to copy the address and then close the Search result pop-up.
  3. In the Directions pane, on line B, highlight and delete the existing address. Press Ctrl+V to paste the new address.
    Tip:

    As you add new destinations, you can type or paste the addresses directly into the Directions pane to save time. The disadvantage of this technique is that you don't see the address location on the map ahead of time—so you wouldn't know if it was in your delivery zone (but these addresses are).

    Moments later, a second customer calls.

  4. In the Directions pane, click Add.

    Add

    An empty line with the letter C symbol is added.

  5. On line C, type 8052 NW 72nd St Tamarac.

    In a few minutes, you get another order.

    Note:

    If you click the address in the list, the route will be created immediately. That's fine—it won't change the eventual results.

  6. Click Add. On line D, type 7801 Fairview Drive Tamarac.

    Suppose that you give this route to Otto and that he leaves the store at 6:00 p.m. Friday.

  7. Click Leave Now and choose Depart At.

    Depart At

  8. For the time, select 6:00 PM. For the day, choose a Friday.
  9. Click Get Directions.

    Three addresses

    The route is created with stops in the order B, C, D, just as they were entered. The round-trip distance is 6.1 miles and the time is 26 minutes. (Your distance and time values may vary depending on the settings in your organization.) It's obvious, however, that the route isn't optimal.

  10. If necessary, click Options.

    In the Directions pane, above the Return to start box, notice the Optimize order check box. This box appears whenever there are three or more destinations (four or more total stops).

    Optimize order

    Note:

    To calculate the trip time using current traffic conditions, check the Show traffic box.

  11. Check the Optimize order box and click Get Directions.

    On the map, the stops are reordered. In the Directions pane, the trip distance is reduced to 5.43 miles and the time is cut to 23 minutes.

    Optimized route

    Tip:

    You don't have to use the Optimize order box to rearrange a route. In the Directions pane (not on the map), you can drag the letter symbols up and down to change their order.

Print directions

Having found the best route, you'll print the map and turn-by-turn directions for the driver. If you don't have a printer connection, you can skip to the next section.

  1. In the Directions pane, click the Print button.

    Print button

    The map and directions open in a new browser window. (It may take a few moments for the map to load.)

  2. Scroll down past the map and notice the text box for notes.

    Suppose the customer on NW 72nd Street made a point of requesting extra duck sauce. You can add this information as a note.

  3. Click in the Enter notes here text box and type Stop B wants extra duck sauce.
  4. At the top of the browser window, click Print.

    A print preview is displayed in the browser window.

  5. Click Print.

    The map and directions are sent to your printer.

  6. At the top of the browser window, click Close.

Save the route as a layer

As you've seen, when you clear directions, the route information disappears. You may, however, want to keep this information for further analysis. For example, you could use a driver's saved routes to calculate reimbursable mileage.

Saving the routes will also save the individual stops. The stop data could be valuable in several ways. It might help you identify popular neighborhoods in which to distribute flyers. Used together with the ArcGIS Online Tapestry Segmentation layer, it could help you develop customer profiles and identify new areas with promising demographics. Eventually, the data could be used in the decision-making process to locate a new restaurant.

  1. In the Directions pane of the Wok & Roll Delivery Zones map, click the Save button.

    Save as layer

    The default name for the new result layer is Wok & Roll – Wok & Roll (the names of the start and end stops of the route). This also saves the layer as an item to My Content, so you can access the layer independently of this particular map. You'll name the layer to indicate that the route was given to Otto on March 10 and that he left the store at 6:00 p.m.

  2. Change the name to Otto March 10 6 PM. Click Save.

    The layer is saved to My Content so you can reuse it later. (Unlike the Delivery zones layer, the route layer is not a web service, so the name doesn't need to be unique within your organization.)

  3. Click the Details button to return to the Contents pane. Uncheck the box next to Otto March 10 6 PM.

    On the map, the route and its stops no longer display.

  4. Check the layer's box to turn it back on.

    You'll also save the Wok & Roll map note layer as an item in My Content.

  5. In the Contents pane, point to the Wok & Roll layer. Click the More Options button and choose Save Layer.
  6. In the Create Item window, in the Tags box, type tags—such as restaurants, Florida—that might help you find the layer in a search. Press Enter after each tag.
  7. For the summary, type Wok & Roll restaurant location.

    Create Item: Wok & Roll

  8. Click Create Item.
  9. Save the map.

Get directions for another trip

Assuming that Otto left the restaurant with three orders at 6:00 p.m., you can expect him to return around 6:30. (His trip time is 23 minutes, and he will spend a couple minutes at each stop.) In the meantime, Blaze, your other driver, is waiting at the restaurant. After a short lull, more calls come in, first from an address in North Lauderdale.

  1. In the Contents pane, uncheck the Otto March 10 6 PM layer to turn it off.
  2. On the map, click the Wok & Roll symbol to open its pop-up and click Get Directions.

    The side pane changes to Directions.

  3. Close the pop-up.
  4. On the ribbon, in the search box, delete the current address and type 8234 SW 7th Court North Lauderdale Florida and press Enter.

    The address is within your surcharge delivery zone.

  5. On the Search result pop-up, highlight the customer address. Press Ctrl+C to copy the address and then close the pop-up.
  6. In the Directions pane, on line B, press Ctrl+V to paste the new address.

    Another customer calls to place an order.

  7. In the Directions pane, click Add.
  8. On line C, type 7370 NW 54th Court Lauderhill Florida.

    While the orders are being prepared, you get another call.

  9. Click Add. On line D, type 7106 NW 63rd St Tamarac Florida.
  10. Click Options.
  11. Check the Optimize order and Return to start boxes.
  12. Click Leave Now and choose Depart At. For the time, select 6:30 PM. For the day, choose a Friday.
  13. Click Get Directions.

    Get Directions

    The directions are calculated, and the map zooms to the route. In this case, the total distance is just over 7.1 miles. The driving time is 23 minutes. Taking into account the time spent at each stop, Blaze should be on the road for about half an hour as well.

Save and compare layers

Assume you print directions for Blaze and he leaves the restaurant at 6:30. Otto hasn't yet come back, but you expect him any minute. You may want to see both drivers' routes on the map at the same time. You also want to save Blaze's route for further analysis, just as you did Otto's.

  1. In the Directions pane, click the Save button.
  2. For Result layer name, type Blaze March 10 630 PM and click Save.
  3. Click the Details button to return to the Contents pane.
  4. Zoom to the Delivery zones bookmark.
  5. In the Contents pane, turn on the Otto March 10 6 PM layer.

    Routes for Otto and Blaze

    The two routes are hard to tell apart because they're the same color. You decide to change Blaze's route to red.

  6. In the Contents pane, click the name of the Blaze March 10 630 PM layer to show its sublayers.

    Route sublayers

    A layer created from directions has four sublayers. You'll look at these more closely in the next lesson; for now, you'll change the symbol color of the DirectionLines sublayer.

  7. In the Contents pane, point to the DirectionLines sublayer and click the Change Style button.

    Change Style

    The side pane changes to Change Style, which gives you the options of changing the attribute and style you want to display. At this point, you're concerned with changing the color of Blaze's route.

  8. In the Change Style pane, under Select a drawing style, click Options.
  9. In the Change Style pane, click Symbols.

    Change Style Symbols

    A color palette opens with options to adjust size, color, pattern, and transparency.

  10. Click a bright red square.

    Color palette

  11. Click OK.
  12. At the bottom of the Change Style pane, click OK.
  13. At the bottom of the Change Style pane, click Done.
  14. In the Contents pane, point to the Blaze March 10 630 PM layer. Click the More Options button and choose Save Layer.

    This saves the red color to the properties of the item in My Content. When you add this layer to a new map, it will be symbolized in red by default.

  15. Zoom in one or two levels and pan the map to put the routes more or less in the center.

    Route colors

    While both drivers are on the road, you can easily compare their routes. When Otto gets back, you can remove his layer from the map. (The layer is still saved in My Content.) As new orders come in, you would start making a new set of directions for Otto. You would eventually save this layer as well.

  16. Zoom to the Delivery zones bookmark.
  17. Save the map.

You've learned how to optimize multiple-stop routes for your drivers.


Analyze data from stops

Previously, you found directions for multiple-stop deliveries and saved the routes as layers. Analyzing the stops over time can give you a better understanding of who your customers are, where they live, and what demographic traits they share. This might help you make advertising plans or decide where to locate a new restaurant.

Next, you'll add your saved routes to a new map. You'll merge the stops from your routes into a single layer and display it against a layer of consumer lifestyle information. Finally, you'll export the layer as a CSV file that can be used for further analysis in spreadsheets or GIS applications. Obviously, the data from two small routes won't tell you much, but the principles of combining, assessing, and exporting the data work the same for larger sets of data.

Add route layers to a map

You'll start a new map and add the route layers you saved in the last lesson.

  1. If necessary, sign in to your ArcGIS organizational account.
  2. At the top of the page, click Map. If you're already signed in and a map is open in your browser, click New Map in the upper right corner of the page. In the New Map window, click Create New Map.

    Create New Map

    A new map opens to the extent of the continental United States.

  3. On the ribbon, click the Add button and choose Search for Layers.
  4. In the Search for Layers pane, at the top, click the In arrow and change the setting from My Organization to My Content.

    Search for Layers

    All layers in My Content are shown in the results as long as their geography lies within the current map extent. (Note the check box limiting search results to the map area.)

    Note:

    Your search results may include more layers than those shown here. You can narrow the results by typing routes or another relevant keyword in the Find box.

  5. In the list of results, click Add to add Otto's 6 PM route to the map.

    Add layer

    The layer is added and the map zooms in to Otto's route.

  6. Click Add to add Blaze's 6:30 PM route to the map.
  7. Click the back arrow to return to Contents.
  8. On the map, zoom and pan as needed to see both routes in the view.

Examine route information

As you've seen, layers created from directions are composed of four sublayers: Stops, DirectionPoints, DirectionLines, and RouteInfo. You'll look at the information associated with the sublayers, but you're mainly interested in the stops.

  1. In the Contents pane, click the name of the Otto March 10 6 PM layer to show its sublayers.

    By default, Stops, DirectionLines, and RouteInfo are turned on and DirectionPoints is turned off.

  2. In the Contents pane, point to the Stops sublayer and click the Show Table button.

    Show Table

    The sublayer's table of information opens at the bottom of the map. It contains the name of each stop (usually its address) and the sequence of stops. You'll use the addresses in the name field.

    Note:

    Not all fields in the table display by default. To see hidden fields, click the Options button in the upper right corner of the table and choose Show/Hide Columns.

  3. In the Contents pane, point to the RouteInfo sublayer and click the Show Table button.

    The table opens and shows the total drive time and distance for the route.

  4. Show the table for the DirectionsLines sublayer.

    This table shows the time and distance for each segment of the route.

  5. In the upper right corner of the table, click the X to hide the table.

Merge the stops

The Stops sublayers contain the address information you want to use for analysis. You'll merge the stops from Otto's route and Blaze's route into a new layer. Assuming you wanted to save all your delivery stops, you would need to decide how often to merge layers. You might do it on a weekly basis, for example.

  1. With Otto's route layer still expanded, point to the Stops sublayer and click the Perform Analysis button.
  2. In the Perform Analysis pane, click Manage Data and choose Merge Layers.

    Merge Layers

  3. In the Merge Layers pane, for Choose layer to merge, select Blaze March 10 630 PM (Stops).
  4. Change the result layer name to Stops March 10 and add your name to make sure the layer name is unique in the organization.
  5. Uncheck the Use current map extent box.

    Merge Layers parameters

    Unchecking the box ensures that any stops outside the current view will be included in the analysis. (There shouldn't be any stops outside the current view, but taking this precaution doesn't hurt.)

  6. Optionally, click Show credits to see how many credits will be used. (It's only a fraction of a credit.)
  7. Click Run Analysis.

    When the Merge Layers operation is finished, the Stops March 10 layer is added to the map.

  8. In the Contents pane, point to the Blaze March 10 630 PM layer. Click the More Options button and choose Remove.
  9. Remove the Otto March 10 6 PM layer in the same way.

    Stops layer

    With the routes removed from the map, you can see the stops in the merged layer. There is one for each of the six destinations and two for Wok & Roll, which is a stop in both original route layers. (The two Wok & Roll points look like one because they are exactly coincident.)

  10. Rename the Stops March 10 layer by removing your name.
  11. In the Contents pane, point to the Stops March 10 layer. Click the More Options button and choose Remove Pop-up.

    In the next section, you'll work with the 2016 USA Tapestry Segmentation layer, and the pop-ups would be a distraction.

Add the 2016 USA Tapestry Segmentation layer

Esri's Tapestry Market Segmentation is a geodemographic system that identifies 67 distinctive markets in the United States by socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. It provides an accurate and comprehensive profile of American consumers for every neighborhood in all 50 states as well as the District of Columbia. These 67 segments are further grouped into 14 larger categories known as LifeMode groups, detailing common lifestyles, characteristics, and experiences.

In this section, you'll add the 2016 Tapestry Segmentation layer to your map and see what you can learn about your customers that might help you improve business.

More information about Tapestry Segmentation is available in the ArcGIS Online help.

  1. On the ribbon, click the Add button and choose Browse Living Atlas Layers.
  2. In the search box, type usa tapestry and press Enter to filter the options.

    Browse Living Atlas Layers

  3. For the 2018 USA Tapestry Segmentation layer, click Add layer to map and choose As Layer. Close the Browse Living Atlas Layers window.

    Tapestry

    The 2018 USA Tapestry Segmentation layer is added to the map. The layer is color-coded by category.

  4. At the top of the Contents pane, click the Show Map Legend button.

    Tapestry Segmentation

    Each color represents one of 14 LifeMode groups. A LifeMode group is composed of more specific segments. A red area feature on the map, for example, may represent any one of the six segments that make up the Senior Styles LifeMode group.

    Three of the sample points on your map, not counting the restaurant itself, lie in the Senior Styles LifeMode group. Of course, this is a tiny sample, but suppose, after collecting many more addresses, you found it to be a common pattern.

  5. On the map, click the red feature that contains two stops.

    Tapestry segment pop-up

    A pop-up summarizes the traits of the Retirement Communities Tapestry segment (one of the segments within Senior Styles) that is dominant at this location. The median household income in this area is rather low, but household sizes are probably small as well.

  6. At the top of the pop-up, click the Retirement Communities (9E) link.

    A new browser tab opens with detailed information about the segment. The demographic information at the top of the page describes the Retirement Communities segment as a nationwide whole. Note that the median age is 52, while for the block group you selected on the map it is 48.

  7. In the Who Are We? column, note that this segment's relatively low income does not prevent its residents from enjoying leisure activities, including eating out.

    Who Are We?

  8. In the Our Neighborhood column, note the last bullet point: one in five households has no vehicle.

    This could help explain the popularity of the restaurant with this Tapestry segment.

  9. In the Socioeconomic Traits column, note that this segment likes to use coupons, is frugal, prefers magazines to computers, and is health-conscious.

    This might stimulate your thinking in a few directions. Offering discount coupons is a good idea—especially on the bottom of flyers you could hang on their doors—while the three-dollar surcharge for long-distance deliveries will probably discourage these customers. Newspaper and magazine advertising will be more successful than online ads. And adding some special healthier-option dishes to the menu could be a good way to increase business.

  10. Scroll down and browse through the rest of the information.

    You may or may not find other valuable information, but what you've found already is interesting.

  11. Close the browser tab containing the Retirement Communities segment information.
  12. On the map, scroll to the bottom of the pop-up.

    Pie chart

    The pop-up contains charts and links to further Tapestry Segmentation resources.

  13. Click the small black arrow to move through the pop-up media.
  14. When you're finished, close the pop-up.

    Studying the Tapestry segments in your delivery zones will be useful when you have more addresses to reference. One way to manage your growing list of stops is to continue merging layers as you've done here. Another way is to extract the stops to a CSV file and manage them as a table.

Extract a layer to a CSV file

A comma-separated value (CSV) file is a tabular file format that can be read by most spreadsheet and database programs. The stop addresses can easily be converted from CSV format back into spatial data at any time.

  1. At the top of the Contents pane, click the Show Contents of Map button.
  2. In the Contents pane, point to the Stops March 10 layer and click the Perform Analysis button.
  3. In the Perform Analysis pane, click Manage Data and click Extract Data.

    Extract Data

    In the Extract Data pane, Stops March 10 is checked as the layer to extract, the study area is set to Same as Display, and the output data format is CSV (.csv or .zip).

    Tip:

    Zoom out a level or two on the map to make sure all your stops are included in the map view.

  4. Change the output file name to Extracted Stops March 10.

    Extract Data parameters

  5. Optionally, click Show credits.
  6. Click Run Analysis.

    Information Message

  7. Click OK on the information message.
  8. In the upper left corner of the page, click the Home menu and choose Content.

    My Content

    The extracted CSV file is an item in My Content. (You may need to refresh your browser to see it.)

  9. Click the ellipsis next to Extracted Stops March 10 and choose Download.

    The file downloaded to your computer will open in the default application associated with CSV files (for example, Microsoft Excel).

  10. Open the downloaded CSV file.

    In the CSV file, the Long, Lat, and Name columns are important. (The latitude-longitude values will be useful when you convert the CSV file back into spatial data.)

  11. Widen these three columns so you can see the values.
  12. Delete the other columns.
  13. Delete the rows for which Name is Wok & Roll.
  14. In column D, type the heading Date.
  15. In the Date column, in row 2, type March 10 and press Enter.

    Your spreadsheet may automatically adjust the date format.

  16. Copy and paste the value to the remaining rows.

    Table reformatted

  17. Save the file. If you're asked whether to save the file in CSV format, click Yes to keep the file in CSV format.

    As you extract more layers to CSV files, you can copy and paste the information from them into a master CSV file (such as this one).

    Tip:

    To convert the CSV file back into a feature layer for map display, read about publishing a CSV file in the ArcGIS Online help topic Publish features.

    You don't need to save the map you created in this lesson.

Congratulations! You have reached the conclusion of Streamline Deliveries with Drive-Time Analysis.

First, you defined a location (the Wok & Roll restaurant) using map notes. You then created drive-time areas around the restaurant to establish your delivery zones. You learned how to get directions for your drivers and how to save the directions as reusable map layers. Then, you saw how delivery addresses could be viewed with ArcGIS Online lifestyle data to help you understand your customer base. You also learned how to extract the addresses to a CSV file for easier data management.

You can find more lessons in the Learn ArcGIS Lesson Gallery.